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askHRgreen.org Hits the Streets with “Write as Rain” Campaign

Posted on April 18, 2017 by | Comments Off

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Launched this week (just in time for Earth Day) on sidewalks, streetscapes and thoroughfares throughout Hampton Roads, the motivational campaign will reveal a bevy of good-to-know “green” messages that become visible when wet.  

With the approval of local municipalities, askHRgreen.org committee members blanketed the region using custom-made stencils and an eco-friendly rain-resistant spray to adhere their messages to sidewalks in locations where residents gather. When it becomes wet, the surface around the message darkens while the stenciled area stays dry and light. The messages carry such sayings as: Only Rain Down the Storm Drain; No Wipes in Our Pipes; Your Morning Shower Starts with Tap Water; and Cigarette Butts are Litter, Too. There are 12 different messages in all!

Why “Write as Rain?”
The goal of the campaign is to inspire people to think about our Hampton Roads environment in ways they haven’t before. What’s more unexpected than a magically appearing message written with rain?

Grab your umbrella and head outside to enjoy the next rainy day in Hampton Roads and look for messages in Chesapeake, Hampton, Isle of Wight County, James City County, Newport News, Portsmouth, Smithfield, Suffolk, Virginia Beach, Williamsburg, York County, and more locations. Find a message near you using our interactive map below and check back often as new locations are added.

Whenever you find one of our hidden messages, don’t forget to snap a photo to share with us on social media #askHRgreen.  

Posted in: Clean and safe tap water, Community events, Don't litter!, Fats, oils and grease disposal, Going Green, HR Green campaign updates, Keeping storm drains free, Reduce reuse and recycle, Waterways

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Naturally Deter Mosquitoes from Your Yard

Posted on April 12, 2017 by | Comments Off

Mosquitoes in the GardenAs the world average temperature rises our winters are becoming milder and summers hotter. This phenomenon is one of the main reasons why mosquito populations are growing so rapidly. Mosquitoes live longer and also breed at a quicker pace in warmer climates. Add that to the naturally wooded areas and waterways that make up Hampton Road and it’s mosquito paradise which is why you should know how to control mosquitoes, and how to do it in an eco-friendly way.

One of the most common mosquitoes in Virginia is the Asian Tiger mosquito, which is notorious for spreading such diseases like Zika and West Nile viruses. So it is very important to know how to prevent their breeding.

Since these mosquitoes like to breed in small, watery spaces, it is very important that we pay extra attention to how we store our trash. Cleaning up litter will not only decrease the number of mosquitoes in your area but will also be beneficial to the environment as a whole. Also, don’t keep any standing water around. Mosquitoes need standing water to breed, so leaving even the smallest capfuls of water standing in your yard will provide mosquitoes more space for breeding. Simply turn over any containers that might collect rain water, clean your gutters and use products like mosquito dunks if you have a pool or rain barrel, so mosquitoes don’t start breeding in your yard.

You can also try planting mosquito repelling plants in your backyard. Plants like citronella grass, marigolds, mint, and lavender to name a few are great at deterring mosquitoes. And they also look great, so on top of having additional mosquito protection you will also have a beautiful garden.

Mosquitoes have been and probably will always be a problem once summer arrives. But you can lessen this problem with these few simple, eco-friendly mosquito control methods.  

Guest blog contributed by Karen Thompson, owner and main editor of InsectCop.net.

Posted in: Gardening, Lawn and landscape

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Add Drought-Tolerant Color to Your Yard

Posted on April 3, 2017 by | Comments Off

1There is nothing lovelier than a yard awash in colorful blooms. However, lush gardens can be difficult to maintain during the dry, hot months of summer.

Fortunately, there are many eco-friendly, drought-tolerant plants that can add vibrant color to even the driest of yards. The key to a beautiful color landscape is choosing plants that thrive in their environment. Keep these tips in mind as you shop for plants.

Stay Close to Home

Look at species native to your area when choosing plants for your garden. Local plants have evolved to survive on the average rainfall in your area and should require very little supplemental water. These plants are also accustomed to the insects and other wildlife in your area, which is best for the ecosystem.  

Stay away from invasive species and plants that are not ideal for your growing zone. It is much harder for non-native species to do well—they often require more water and are less pest- and disease-resistant. You avoid the need for chemical fertilizers and toxic pesticides if you choose plants that naturally thrive in their surroundings.

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Think Succulents
In desert-like, extremely dry areas, some of the most popular drought tolerant plants are succulents and cacti. The fleshy leaves of these plants hold water and allow them to thrive in even the driest of environments. You can find succulents in a huge variety of colors, sizes and shapes, making them a great fit for almost any garden. If your area gets a hard freeze in the winter, consider growing succulents in pots and containers so you can bring them inside once the weather turns cold.

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Pick Perennials

You may immediately think of flowering annuals when you think about garden color, but there are an unlimited number of flowering perennials that can add pops of color to your space year after year as well. Perennials tend to be hardier than annuals and come in a variety of types. You can find perennial ground covers, climbing vines, grasses, shrubs and even roses and flowering bulbs, many of which are drought tolerant. Remember that perennials come back year after year and continue to grow, so when putting them into the ground, make sure you leave enough room for the plants to expand.

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Change It Up with Annuals

Annuals complete their life cycle in one season and are a great way to add supplemental color to your yard or garden. Because of their short lifespan, annuals tend to be prolific bloomers and are showier and bolder than their perennial counterparts. Planting a few new annuals every year allows you to change up the look of your planting beds.

In some warmer climates, annuals can survive multiple seasons, which make them act like pseudo-perennials. You may want to experiment with different varieties to see how they do in your specific zone.

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Consider the Foliage

We often associate color with blooms, flowers or fruits, but foliage can be a long-lasting and easy to maintain source of color in your yard. Colorful grasses and shrubs add large bold swaths of color, while trees can not only provide seasonal color, but can also add shade and protect the plants below from the heat and direct sun of summer.

Just like other plants, drought-tolerant trees do best when planted in their native climate. Keep in mind that many trees are only considered drought-tolerant once they are established. Small trees and saplings require more water to promote proper root growth and expansion.

Be Wise About Water

Conserving water in your garden and yard shouldn’t end with your plant choices. You can reduce the amount of water you need to use in your garden if you’re smart about your watering habits. Here are a few tips:

  • Make sure you water plants during the cooler hours of the day.
  • Use drip line irrigation instead of sprinklers, which lose a lot of water to evaporation.
  • Add mulch and compost to your planting beds to trap in moisture.

 

A beautiful garden begins with good plant choices and lasts with proper care and maintenance. Focus on native plants that do well in your specific zone and won’t require a lot of additional water or pest prevention. Then add color through blooms and foliage, and consider both annuals and perennials to give the perfect balance of seasonal color and hardiness.

With her three kids and a busy home life in the San Francisco area, Kim Six is a DIY home improvement blogger who keeps her eye on organizational techniques. Kim writes her home lifestyle and organizing tips for Home Depot. For gardening options for all environments, visit the Home Depot site here.

Posted in: Beautification, Gardening, Lawn and landscape, Lawncare, Outdoor tips

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When Bottled Water Reigns, Our Environment Loses

Posted on March 10, 2017 by | Comments Off

water-bottle-910787_960_720I’m reminded of a Beatles song this morning…”I read the news today, oh boy!”

And, oh boy, the news is not good. Business Insider reports that bottled water sales have now surpassed the sale of carbonated soft drinks. Now that’s great for our country’s health and our collective waistlines but it’s oh so bad for our environment. Bottled water consumption grew by 9 percent to 12.8 billion gallons in 2016. The most frustrating part of the bottled water trend might be the fact that half of bottled water is not from a mountain spring in a pristine forest somewhere in the Pacific Northwest or a remote tropical island. Nope. Bottled water is often regular municipal tap water, pumped through a filter and into a bottle at 2,000 times the cost of filling up a reusable bottle. Bottled water is even produced in drought-plagued areas of our country contributing to local water crises in places like California and Maine. Other baffling facts surrounding the bottled water trend include:

  • Bottled water is not held to the same quality standards as municipal tap water. Municipal tap water is constantly monitored by a local lab with standards set through the EPA. Bottled water has only moderate monitoring standards set through the FDA . For example, coliform bacteria testing is done once per week for bottled water and more than 100 times per month for municipal tap water.
  • It takes three times the amount of water to produce a plastic water bottle than it does to fill it. That’s 36 ounces of water used per 12 ounce bottle of water.
  • An estimated 17 million barrels of oil are consumed each year to produce and transport bottled water. That’s enough to power 1 million cars for a year!
  • 22 billion water bottles end up in landfills each year and will take hundreds of years to decompose.
  • You can refill a 20 ounce refillable water bottle at any tap in Hampton Roads 1,500 times for the same cost as a single container of bottled water.

So don’t be a sucker. Don’t fall prey to the hype. Instead, pick up a reusable water bottle to fill with tap water to make a healthy choice for your body and our environment.

To learn even more about the true cost of bottled water, check out the documentary Tapped.

 

Posted in: Clean and safe tap water, Don't litter!, Reduce reuse and recycle, Using water wisely

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How it Was 25 Years Ago – HRWET to Water Awareness

Posted on March 3, 2017 by | Comments Off

HR WET Logo - OriginalOn a typical, cold, rainy February morning in 1992 at the General McArthur Memorial conference room, regional water utility representatives came together for the initial meeting of what would become the askHRgreen.org Water Awareness Committee. Coffee, donuts and bagels on the table provided sustenance to about 75 water utility directors, planners, administrative and budget employees from cities and counties throughout the Hampton Roads region while they discussed how to promote water conservation and wise water usage.

It just seemed ludicrous because the region is surrounded by water from the ocean on one side, to the bay, rivers and creeks on the other.  Isn’t that plenty of water?  The short answer is, no.  Salt water doesn’t do it. The Hampton Roads region was growing rapidly at the time. While new water resources were being sought, current usage needed to be “stretched.”  In a word, conserved.

Event2Event16 cities and counties under the umbrella of the Hampton Roads Planning District made the fateful decision 25 years ago to pool resources and form an educational team to create the conservation education program known as the Hampton Roads Water Efficiency Team or HRWET for short.  Our logo was the sun – Saving Today’s Water for Tomorrow’s Hampton Roads.

Today, HRWET is known as the askHRgreen.org Water Awareness Committee, one of four environmental educational groups – Fats, Oils, and Grease (FOG), Recycling & Beautification, and Stormwater Education – that make up askHRgreen.org.

We’ve gotten a lot done in 25 years and look forward to continuing our efforts to education Hampton Roads about the value, quality and availability of Hampton Roads tap water. Enjoy this trip down memory lane!

Blog post contributed by Jerry Hoddinott, Chesapeake Public Utilities and original member of the HRWET team!

  11th Anniversary

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Posted in: HR Green campaign updates, Using water wisely

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